Wednesday, August 13, 2014


Pollinators - Bees

Yes, this a traditional Honey Bee operation for
the production of Honey.  This photo is used with
the permission of the photographer
The National Garden Club is concerned about the decrease in Honey Bee population.  We need bees to pollinate a lot of the items we enjoy.

A Letter From Linda Nelson
As I began my term as President of National Garden Clubs, one of the things I focused on in my installation speech was our Conservation Pledge. It states: "I pledge to protect and conserve the natural resources of the planet earth and promise to promote education so we may become better caretakers of our air, water, forest, land, and wildlife." One way we can do that is through partnering with other organizations that are committed, like we are, to preserving, protecting and nurturing our natural resources for the betterment of all.
We are actively engaged in one such partnership with Crown Bees to learn more about Mason Bees and how we can encourage them in our gardens. They are non-aggressive and excellent pollinators, and through Crown's BeeGAP program, we can participate in the growth of this important resource.
BeeGAP stands for: "Bee Gardener Adding Pollinators." It describes a life cycle system that encourages gardeners to change their yards into bee havens and a garden oasis. The goal is for backyard gardeners to nurture bees that can then be sold through a buy-back program and provided to farmers for commercial use.
At present, the majority of commercial farmers rely on honey bees for pollination due to the strength and depth of the honey bee industry. However, as many of us know, the honey bee population has been experiencing stress and loss due to various environmental issues.
Many farmers don't yet realize the value of the solitary mason bee or the benefits of being a mason bee keeper. Mason bees are efficient pollinators. In some cases it takes as little as 100 mason bees to produce the same amount of fruit or vegetables as 560 honey bees.
On the other side of the equation, many gardeners don't realize the power of their backyards yet. Without knowing it, many gardeners raise hundreds of these bees without realizing their value to commercial farmers nearby. They can help pollinate local orchards!
Currently, the honey bee existence is facing continual losses. We either watch this continue and do nothing about this, or we look for and provide alternative solutions. It's up to us. One of the solutions is that we can provide safe homes for mason bees, and other solitary bees to help pollinate our crops.
BeeGAP is an alternate solution with a long-term vision to helping our crops achieve pollination. Our role, today, is vital, and I am proud to sponsor this important initiative as a Presidential Project.

For more information, visit the Crown Bees website atwww.crownbees.com
Or, contact our Crown Bees liaison: Debbie Skow

Members of The Garden Club of Georgia may also contact:

As chairman of BeeGAP, I think everyone should know about the new video available online: http://www.growingagreenerworld.com/solitary-bees-pollinators/ .  This is video of Joe Lamp’l and Crown Bee founder Dave Hunter discussing importance of solitary bees and ease of having mason bees.  It even shows Joe building a bee house and filling it with tubes rolled from scrap paper around a pencil. It will take about thirty minutes of your time, but is well worth it.  Everyone should also check out the Crown Bee website www.crownbees.com .  Under the Learn tab is a mini-course 25 pages, 9 short) explaining everything you need to know about having mason bees in your garden.   You can read online, print it out, and/or explore all the other options at Crown Bees.  Remember NGC has partnered with Crown Bees to help raise awareness of the importance of pollinators and to offer fund-raising opportunities to your clubs.

Judy
Judith S. Kirkland
1055 Fieldstone Road
Grovetown, Georgia 30813


Saturday, May 17, 2014

86th Annual Convention - 14-15 May 2014 - Macon

You may view a larger image
of this picture by clicking on it.




























One of the Convention Chair persons with the
National President.








The National President!!


Even if you were not able to attend the 86th Annual Garden Club of Georgia, Inc. Convention in Macon, Georgia I trust that you will enjoy these pictures.  I tried to get a good picture of all of the designs and all of the informative displays.  You will also note that the President of the National Garden Clubs, Linda Nelson was present.  She gave a very inspiring and also informative talk at the Wednesday Evening Awards Banquet.  The crowd pictures were also taken at that Banquet.

Friday, April 18, 2014

April Beauty in Middle Georgia

Garden Club Members Everywhere realize that we have much to be proud of and also Thankful for.  Please encourage your friends and neighbors to also enjoy that which surrounds us all.

Today I share some of the beauty that we enjoy in Middle Georgia.  I realize that South Georgia is ahead of us and that North Georgia will be a bit later.  As always, I encourage everyone to enjoy the beauty in the Gardens.  

Thank You!!!!






Saturday, March 1, 2014

Blooming In Middle Georgia - 1 March 2014

Camellia Japonica  This flower is the Winter and Spring
Camellia.  It thrives in a shaded area with well drained soil

Lenten Rose - Helleborus orientalis.  This lovely flower is appreciated
because the Deer do not consume it.  It stays green all year and
the lovely flowers are in abundance from January through
March.  This year they have been about five weeks late.  In order
to obtain great pictures of this flower you must lay on the soil.  It
thrives in shade in a well drained area and enjoys the cover of Camellia
and other shade loving shrubs.  It is my favorite flower of the Winter
Season.







Snowdrop - Galanthus nwalis.  These lovely flowers thrive with
no attention.  Ours love their placement at the base of
several trees in th Woods behind our home.



Daffodil - Narcissus.  These lovely flowers are also
about five weeks behind a normal bloom season.
They are beautiful this year and are blooming in
abundance.


Another shrub which is in flower at this time is the Daphne Odera.  It has a sweet fragrance and I enjoy it very much.  If you have never experienced the fragrance of the Daphne Odera think of a Tea Olive and multiply that fragrance at least five times.  A lovely low care shrub that blooms in the Winter and stays green all year.  The Daphne Odear which adorn our Garden enjoy their placement under the Camellias and thrive with no special care.  We have enjoyed these for at least eighteen years.